Cacao / Tablea

The Philippine tablea is defined as roasted, ground and molded nibs of fermented pure (100%) cacao beans without added ingredients and additives. It is also a cocoa mass and cocoa liquor made from cacao beans that are fermented, dried, roasted, ground then molded into blocks, balls, discs, or tablets.

It is traditionally used in the Philippines to make a hot chocolate beverage using a wooden mixing implement or stirrer. The Cacao Industry Development Association of Mindanao estimated that around 2,000 tons of cacao beans is processed to tablea.

 

About Cacao / Tablea

The industry is composed mostly of smallholder farmers who supply dry cacao beans to the processors/manufacturers. Manufacturers are mostly small to medium scale enterprises. Some of the larger players are also into cocoa powder and cocoa butter.

The country exports and imports cocoa and cocoa products which includes chocolate confectionery containing cocoa in various forms and sizes, other food preparations containing cocoa in various forms and sizes, other than chocolate confectionery containing cocoa in various forms and sizes, and other than chocolate confectionery containing cocoa in tablets or pastilles. Total imports of cocoa and cocoa products in 2012 amounted to 3,662 tons, with CIF value of almost US$ 12 million. On the other hand, total exports in 2012 is 512 tons, with a total FOB value of US$ 1.8 million.

The market opportunities for tablea and cocoa products is growing, as there is an increasing number of cafes and restaurants offering chocolate drinks. Moreover, the trend towards wellness and a healthy lifestyle is seen as another opportunity for cocoa, as it is being positioned and marketed as a health food given its natural contents and health benefits. It is projected that by 2020, there is an additional one million tons of cacao needed to meet global demand, while an additional 30,000 tons are needed to meet local demand. As such, cacao growers and cocoa manufacturers in the country are well-positioned to translate these market opportunities into a profitable reality.

 

Facts and Figures

Imports of Cocoa and Cocoa Preparations (‘000 kgs.)

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Cocoa beans, whole or broken, raw or roasted                143                  123                738                307                150                223
Cocoa shells, husks, skins and waste            2,047            2,151            2,032            1,753            1,969            2,633
Cocoa paste            5,889            6,080            5,434            4,522                640                579
Cocoa powder, unsweetened          12,615          13,284          15,024          13,872          11,120          13,340
Chocolate and other foods containing cocoa          13,285          11,645          12,453          12,711          13,939          16,655

Source: United Nations Commodity Trade Statistics Database

 

Exports of Cocoa and Cocoa Preparations (‘000 kgs.)

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Cocoa beans, whole or broken, raw or roasted                107                299                196                127                440                554
Cocoa shells, husks, skins and waste                            –                  20                            –                            –                            –                            –
Cocoa paste                            –                121                  41                265                245                138
Cocoa powder, unsweetened                  74                313                663                812                  21                  15
Chocolate and other foods containing cocoa                827                784                863                786            1,028            3,002

Source: United Nations Commodity Trade Statistics Database

 

Policies

IPP 2014-2016

The production of cacao as a commercial production activity is among the preferred activities listed in the IPP. All projects must be endorsed by the Department of Agriculture (DA).

The manufacture of tablea as a commercial processing activity can be considered among the preferred activities listed in the IPP. Commercial processing covers the (1) extraction of higher value substances from agricultural and fishery raw materials through bioprocessing; or (2) conversion of agricultural and fishery products or wastes to a form ready for further processing or final consumption.

Commercial processing of agricultural products should involve the use of domestically-produced raw or semi-processed agricultural products, unless these inputs are not locally available (NLP) or are not in sufficient quantity (NISQ).

If using imported raw or semi-processed agricultural products that are locally-produced (LP) or in sufficient quantity (ISQ), the project may qualify for registration, provided that the finished/final product is for export, or the project qualifies for pioneer status.

BPS Product Certification Scheme

The certification of cocoa products is guided by the Philippine Standard (PS) Quality and/or Safety Certification Mark Scheme.

PNS for Cocoa Products

There is a Philippine National Standard covering  cocoa beansPhilippine tablea, and code of agricultural practices for cacao beans and Philippine tablea and Philippine cacao beans.

 

Programs

Shared Service Facilities (SSF) Project

The Shared Service Facilities (SSF) Project is a major component of the MSME Development (MSMED) Program of the DTI and aims to improve the productivity and competitiveness of MSMEs by providing them with machinery, equipment, tools, systems, skills, and knowledge under a shared system.

The SSF Project seeks to address processing and manufacturing gaps and bottlenecks in the value chain of priority industry clusters, particularly those in agribusiness.

 

Champions

No champions found.

Carrageenan

Among the world’s top biggest exporters, the Philippines is a well-known and leading producer of carrageenan. “Philippine-grade” carrageenan is one of the most reliable inputs in meat processing, processed food, dairy products, condiments, personal care products, and pet food products.

 

About Carrageenan

The Philippines produces high-quality, food-grade carrageenan. About 70% of Philippine carrageenan exports are refined carrageenan, while about 27% are semi-refined. As an export industry, Philippine carrageenan exhibits high export performance vis-à-vis its key competitors, with exports from 2004 to 2013 reaching an average of US$ 101.5 million and amounting to about 13,100 tons per year. Nonetheless, there remains much room for growth in the manufacture of carrageenan through investments in the production of raw materials (seaweed) and advanced technology for processing.

With a global market of 50,400 tons amounting to US$ 615.9 million in 2013, the Philippines stands to benefit from this growing market through increased production of red seaweeds and carrageenan and the conduct of sound research and development initiatives to enhance locally-produced carrageenan.

 

Policies

IPP 2014-2016

The manufacture of carrageenan as a commercial processing activity can be considered among the preferred activities listed in the IPP. Commercial processing covers the (1) extraction of higher value substances from agricultural and fishery raw materials through bioprocessing; or (2) conversion of agricultural and fishery products or wastes to a form ready for further processing or final consumption.

Commercial processing of agricultural products should involve the use of domestically-produced raw or semi-processed agricultural products, unless these inputs are not locally available (NLP) or are not in sufficient quantity (NISQ).

If using imported raw or semi-processed agricultural products that are locally-produced (LP) or in sufficient quantity (ISQ), the project may qualify for registration, provided that the finished/final product is for export, or the project qualifies for pioneer status.

The manufacture of carrageenan as export products can also be considered as among the export activities listed in the IPP. The production and manufacture of export products covers the production/manufacture of non-traditional export products and with export requirement of at least 50% of its output, if Filipino-owned or at least 70%, if foreign-owned.

 

Programs

Shared Service Facilities (SSF) Project

The Shared Service Facilities (SSF) Project is a major component of the MSME Development (MSMED) Program of the DTI and aims to improve the productivity and competitiveness of MSMEs by providing them with machinery, equipment, tools, systems, skills, and knowledge under a shared system.

The SSF Project seeks to address processing and manufacturing gaps and bottlenecks in the value chain of priority industry clusters, particularly those in agribusiness.

 

Champions

Board of Investments

Mr. Francis Peñaflor
Sectoral Champion

Industry and Investments Building,

385 Senator Gil Puyat Ave.,

Makati City, Philippines

Tel. No. (+632) 895-3977

Email: [email protected]

Condiments

Condiments and sauces are among the country’s essential food products. In a country where eating and dining is an important social activity, these products are constantly profitable and will continue to experience high levels of demand as the population increases. In this regard, the Philippine condiments industry can enhance its competitiveness in specialty products, as well as explore other export markets in order to increase sales and accelerate growth.

 

About Condiments

Philippine-made vinegar, soy sauce, ketchup, and fish sauces are some of the more competitive products of the domestic industry, with the United States, United Arab Emirates, and Saudi Arabia as its largest markets. Its competitiveness is attributed to its relatively low export prices, availability of technologies in the production of condiments and sauces, and relatively low labor costs in urban and rural areas.

While there are about 1,000 manufacturers of condiments and sauces in the country, only 50% are approved by the Philippine Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which means that there is still untapped potential for increasing supply if the remaining 500 companies are supported through additional investments.

Through proper investments and government support, the Philippine condiments industry can further develop or expand production of more specialty products, such as fish sauces, oyster sauces, hot pepper sauces, sour soup (sinigang) mixes, chili sauces, and even inputs to ready-to-cook meals.

Finally, overseas demand from key markets (such as the United States) and overseas Filipino workers in other countries, low prices of raw materials, growing consumption by Filipinos of food services, and prevailing preference of consumers for quick-cook food products provide a positive outlook for the Philippine condiments and sauces industry both for the domestic and foreign markets.

 

Policies

IPP 2014-2016

The manufacture of condiments as a commercial processing activity can be considered among the preferred activities listed in the IPP. Commercial processing of agricultural products should involve the use of domestically-produced raw or semi-processed agricultural products, unless these inputs are not locally available (NLP) or are not in sufficient quantity (NISQ).

If using imported raw or semi-processed agricultural products that are locally-produced (LP) or in sufficient quantity (ISQ), the project may qualify for registration, provided that the finished/final product is for export, or the project qualifies for pioneer status.

 

Programs

Shared Service Facilities (SSF) Project

The Shared Service Facilities (SSF) Project is a major component of the MSME Development (MSMED) Program of the DTI and aims to improve the productivity and competitiveness of MSMEs by providing them with machinery, equipment, tools, systems, skills, and knowledge under a shared system.

The SSF Project seeks to address processing and manufacturing gaps and bottlenecks in the value chain of priority industry clusters, particularly those in agribusiness.

 

Champions

Board of Investments

Ms. Lillian Cotaz
Sectoral Champion

Industry and Investments Building,

385 Senator Gil Puyat Ave.,

Makati City Philippines

Tel. No.: (632) 895-3977

Email: [email protected]

Processed Fruit

Dried mangoes is among the more competitive food manufactured products in the Philippines. The country’s brand of dried mangoes is well-recognized around the world, with 85% of total dried mango local production exported to key markets, such as the United States, China, Japan, South Korea, and other Asia Pacific countries. Because of the wide acceptability of dried mangoes worldwide, the Philippines can reap greater benefits by expanding its market coverage and deepening the value of dried mango production in the country.

 

About Processed Fruit

Compared to its competitors, Philippine dried mangoes are known for its premium cuts of carabao mango, a variety that is of more abundant in the Philippines and is more efficient to use because of its thick flesh (“cheek”). Because of the high quality of this raw material, Philippine dried mangoes are also distinguished from its competitors for its naturally sweet, juicy, and fresh taste. Through the available technology used by local processors, the potential for growth in dried mango production lies in increasing the raw material base – that is, by establishing more efficient mango tree plantations – and improving the firms’ marketing and supply chain operations.

Several demand factors show the huge potential for export sales in dried mangoes. Looking into its key markets, consumers in developed countries have increasingly turned to natural and organic products for their nutritional needs. Dried mangoes are seen as a healthier and more natural snack option compared to the regular potato chips or artificial sweets and candies. Also, dried mangoes have been increasingly used in confectionery and bakery products. Spurred by consumption of overseas Filipino workers, increased tourist presence in the Philippines, and high population with disposable income, there is huge export potential and local demand for Philippine dried mangoes. Finally, due to the recent inclusion of the Philippines in the European Union’s Generalized System of Preferences Plus (EU GSP+), there is an untapped market potential for European consumers of natural food products particularly dried mangoes.

Policies

IPP 2014-2016

The manufacture of dried mangoes as a commercial processing activity can be considered among the preferred activities listed in the IPP. Commercial processing of agricultural products should involve the use of domestically-produced raw or semi-processed agricultural products, unless these inputs are not locally available (NLP) or are not in sufficient quantity (NISQ).

If using imported raw or semi-processed agricultural products that are locally-produced (LP) or in sufficient quantity (ISQ), the project may qualify for registration, provided that the finished/final product is for export, or the project qualifies for pioneer status.

BPS Product Certification Scheme

The certification of dried fruits is guided by the Philippine Standard (PS) Quality and/or Safety Certification Mark Scheme.

PNS for Dried Fruits

There is a Philippine National Standard for dried fruits.

 

Programs

Shared Service Facilities (SSF) Project

The Shared Service Facilities (SSF) Project is a major component of the MSME Development (MSMED) Program of the DTI and aims to improve the productivity and competitiveness of MSMEs by providing them with machinery, equipment, tools, systems, skills, and knowledge under a shared system.

The SSF Project seeks to address processing and manufacturing gaps and bottlenecks in the value chain of priority industry clusters, particularly those in agribusiness.

 

Champions

Board of Investments

Mr. Mario Pocholo Orense
Sectoral Champion

Industry and Investments Building,

385 Senator Gil Puyat Ave,

Makati City Philippines

Tel. No.: (632) 895-3977

Email: [email protected]

Processed Meat

The Philippine processed meat industry has six different product categories: fresh processed meat products, cured meat pieces, raw-cooked products, pre-cooked products, raw (dry) – fermented sausages, and dried meat. Major export products are sausages, corned beef, bacon, luncheon meat, and other indigenous meat products.

 

About Processed Meat

The country is a net exporter of processed meat products. In 2013, the industry generated US$ 47.3 million in exports. Major export markets include the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Japan, the United States, Canada, Guam, and Taiwan. The local industry imports around 85% of its raw material inputs. In terms of finished processed meat, majority of its output meets domestic demand.

There are 175 meat processors in the country, majority of which are located in the National Capital Region, Region III, and Region IV-A.

The Philippine Association of Meat Processors, Inc. (PAMPI) is composed of member companies which produce about 600 million kilos of meat products worth over P 90 billion. Canned and processed meat products manufactured include ham, hotdog, luncheon meat, sausage and bacon.

 

Policies

IPP 2014-2016

The manufacture of processed meat products as a commercial processing activity can be considered among the preferred activities listed in the IPP. Commercial processing covers the (1) extraction of higher value substances from agricultural and fishery raw materials through bioprocessing; or (2) conversion of agricultural and fishery products or wastes to a form ready for further processing or final consumption.

Commercial processing of agricultural products should involve the use of domestically-produced raw or semi-processed agricultural products, unless these inputs are not locally available (NLP) or are not in sufficient quantity (NISQ).

If using imported raw or semi-processed agricultural products that are locally-produced (LP) or in sufficient quantity (ISQ), the project may qualify for registration, provided that the finished/final product is for export, or the project qualifies for pioneer status.

BPS Product Certification Scheme

The certification of meat products is guided by the Philippine Standard (PS) Quality and/or Safety Certification Mark Scheme.

PNS for Meat Products

There is a Philippine National Standard for meat products.

 

Programs

Shared Service Facilities (SSF) Project

The Shared Service Facilities (SSF) Project is a major component of the MSME Development (MSMED) Program of the DTI and aims to improve the productivity and competitiveness of MSMEs by providing them with machinery, equipment, tools, systems, skills, and knowledge under a shared system.

The SSF Project seeks to address processing and manufacturing gaps and bottlenecks in the value chain of priority industry clusters, particularly those in agribusiness.

 

Champions

Board of Investments (BOI)

Mr. Francis Peñaflor
Sectoral Champion

Industry and Investments Building,

385 Senator Gil Puyat Ave.,

Makati City, Philippines

Tel. No. (+632) 895-3977

Email: [email protected]

Processed Shrimp

Shrimp is one of the seven major aquaculture species in the Philippines and is one of the country’s two major aquaculture exports, sent to countries such as Japan, Korea, and the United States. Shrimp farming in the Philippines uses a variety of systems which are affected by the climate, availability of capital, site location, sources of water supply, the marketing of harvested products, and the availability and cost of farm inputs.

 

About Processed Shrimp

The Philippines is a net exporter of shrimp, which contributed 25% to total fish and fisheries exports in 2013 and amounting to US$ 558 million.  The country exports various types of processed shrimp, including frozen, head-on or headless, and un-shelled or shelled.

There are a number of shrimp processing plants approved by the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) located in Manila, Bohol, Butuan, and General Santos City. These sell shrimp products such as pasteurized bottled sautéed shrimp; fresh frozen black tiger or white shrimp; shrimp powder, frozen block shrimp; and frozen pre-cooked peeled shrimp.

The are numerous available areas for shrimp culture and production in the country, thanks to its archipelagic nature. The strong presence of prawn growers’ cooperatives in the country provides needed support to the supply chain. Lastly, the availability of trained technicians for good manufacturing practices (GMP) and other food safety standards and requirements ensures that the industry will have high quality produce.

 

Facts and Figures

Imports of Shrimps and Prawns (‘000 kgs.)

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Shrimps and prawns, frozen 1,612 1,615 1,962 2,192 2,878 2,736
Shrimps and prawns, prepared or preserved 110 85 147 155 48 20

Source: United Nations Commodity Trade Statistics Database

 

Exports of Shrimps and Prawns (‘000 kgs.)

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Shrimps and prawns, frozen 11,235 12,777 11,706 10,441 6,220 201,320
Shrimps and prawns, prepared or preserved 1,132 1,428 1,508 1,466 1,042 923

Source: United Nations Commodity Trade Statistics Database

 

Policies

IPP 2014-2016

The manufacture of processed shrimp and prawn products as a commercial processing activity can be considered among the preferred activities listed in the IPP. Commercial processing covers the (1) extraction of higher value substances from agricultural and fishery raw materials through bioprocessing; or (2) conversion of agricultural and fishery products or wastes to a form ready for further processing or final consumption.

Commercial processing of agricultural products should involve the use of domestically-produced raw or semi-processed agricultural products, unless these inputs are not locally available (NLP) or are not in sufficient quantity (NISQ).

If using imported raw or semi-processed agricultural products that are locally-produced (LP) or in sufficient quantity (ISQ), the project may qualify for registration, provided that the finished/final product is for export, or the project qualifies for pioneer status.

 

Programs

Shared Service Facilities (SSF) Project

The Shared Service Facilities (SSF) Project is a major component of the MSME Development (MSMED) Program of the DTI and aims to improve the productivity and competitiveness of MSMEs by providing them with machinery, equipment, tools, systems, skills, and knowledge under a shared system.

The SSF Project seeks to address processing and manufacturing gaps and bottlenecks in the value chain of priority industry clusters, particularly those in agribusiness.

 

Champions

Board of Investments (BOI)

Ms. Sandra Marie Recolizado
Sectoral Champion

Industry and Investments Building,

385 Senator Gil Puyat Ave,

Makati City Philippines

Tel. No.: (632) 897-6682 loc. 257

Email: [email protected]

 

Agribusiness

Agribusiness refers to agriculture-related activities that put farmers, processors, distributors, and consumers within a system that produces, processes, transports, markets, and distributes agricultural products.

The transformation of agricultural farming into a thriving agribusiness-driven sector entails acquiring farming technologies, training in more sophisticated farming techniques, creating stable supply chains, establishing transport and agricultural infrastructure, investing and research and development, and securing a reliable property rights regime.

These activities can contribute not only in diversifying and increasing the value of agribusiness outputs, but also contribute to the inclusive growth and rural development agenda of the Philippine government. Because of this, the agribusiness sector is positioned to largely contribute to the industrial development of the Philippine economy.

 

Vision of the Industry

The vision is to transform and upgrade the agriculture sector from traditional farming to agribusiness or industrial clusters to take advantage of opportunities in rubber, coconut, mangoes, bananas, coffee, palm oil, cacao, and other emerging high value crops.

 

Goals and Strategies

Short-run (2014-2017) Goals:

  • Improve productivity of high value crops where regional comparative advantage lies
  • Strengthen our capacity in emerging high value crops

Medium-run (2018-2021) Goals:

  • Strengthen agro-processing and the linkages between production (agriculture) and processing (manufacturing)
  • Strengthen supply chains and commodity clusters

Long-run (2022-2025) Goals:

  • Deepen participation in global value chains

 

Strategic Actions

  • Strengthen coordination mechanism among stakeholders
  • Address supply chain gaps and other coordination issues
  • Provide support to small farmers especially access to technologies, technical knowledge and production issues as well as access to finance
  • Promote green and climate resilient products
  • Investment in rural infrastructure
  • Investment in innovation and R&D
  • Strengthen regulatory and certification system
  • Property rights regime

 

Economic Contribution and Growth Performance

Growth Performance

The agricultural sector, as a whole, has only grown by an average of 1.1% in the last five years in terms of value added. At the sub-sector level, the fishery sector has registered the fastest growth of the three components, with an average value added growth of 9.2% from 2009 to 2013. It is followed by the agriculture (crops, livestock and poultry) sub-sector, with an average value added growth of 1.4%. In this sub-sector, the cassava and poultry segments, which have registered average value added growth rates of more or less 4%, are the top performers. The forestry sector contracted, on the average, by 0.3% during the same period.

Value Added Growth Performance (in percent)

Year 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2009-2013
TOTAL INDUSTRY -0.7 -0.2 2.6 2.8 1.1 1.1
     AGRICULTURE -1.6 0.2 4.2 3.6 0.9 1.4
Palay -1.2 -2.4 5.9 8.0 2.2 2.5
Corn 1.4 -8.9 9.5 6.3 -0.4 1.6
Coconut with Copra 2.1 -0.6 -2.2 4.2 -3.5 0.0
Sugarcane -6.3 -15.7 59.7 -8.9 -6.9 4.4
Banana 4.2 0.6 0.7 0.7 -6.3 0.0
Mango -12.5 6.9 -4.6 -2.6 6.2 -1.3
Pineapple -1.1 -0.3 3.2 7.1 2.8 2.3
Coffee -1.2 -2.0 -6.8 1.4 -11.6 -4.1
Cassava 3.2 4.8 5.1 1.1 6.3 4.1
Rubber -5.1 1.3 7.8 4.0 0.4 1.7
Other Crops -0.5 2.7 -3.2 1.5 0.2 0.2
Livestock -1.0 0.6 2.0 1.1 1.8 0.9
Poultry -2.0 7.7 4.4 4.6 4.2 3.8
Agricultural Service -8.6 3.3 3.0 2.1 0.6 0.1
     FORESTRY 3.0 -0.5 -4.3 -0.4 0.7 -0.3
     FISHERY -2.0 -31.3 40.5 2.3 36.7 9.2

Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics

Value Added Contribution The value added

The value added share of agriculture to GDP has been the lowest among the three major sectors of the economy since 2008. At the sub-sector level, agriculture (crops, livestock and poultry) has the largest average value added contribution, with an 80% average share from 2008 to 2013, whereas the fishery sector has the lowest contribution, with only a marginal average share of 0.6% for the same period. The top contributors for the agriculture sub-sector are palay, livestock and poultry, with more than 10% contribution to the total agricultural industry value added share.

Agriculture Value Added Contribution (in percent)

Year 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2008-2013
Industry 32.8 31.8 33.6 32.1 32.1 32.8 32.5
Services 48.9 50.1 49.7 56.4 56.9 56.8 53.1
Agriculture 18.3 18.1 16.8 11.5 11.1 10.4 14.4
AGRICULTURE (crops, livestock  and poultry) 79.5 78.8 79.0 80.2 80.8 80.7 79.8
Palay 19.1 19.0 18.6 19.2 20.1 20.4 19.4
Corn 5.6 5.7 5.2 5.6 5.8 5.7 5.6
Coconut with Copra 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.3 4.4 4.2 4.4
Sugarcane 2.2 2.0 1.7 2.7 2.4 2.2 2.2
Banana 4.7 5.0 5.0 4.9 4.8 4.5 4.8
Mango 2.4 2.1 2.3 2.1 2.0 2.1 2.2
Pineapple 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.2 2.2 2.1
Coffee 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.5
Cassava 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.2
Rubber 0.5 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5
Other Crops 6.1 6.1 6.3 6.0 5.9 5.8 6.1
Livestock 13.6 13.5 13.7 13.6 13.3 13.4 13.5
Poultry 9.7 9.6 10.3 10.5 10.7 11.0 10.3
Agricultural Service 7.5 6.9 7.1 7.2 7.1 7.1 7.2
     FORESTRY 19.9 20.7 20.6 19.2 18.6 18.5 19.6
     FISHERY 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.6

Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics

 

Employment Contribution

The agriculture sector, as a whole, has been the second biggest employment contributor to total employment since 2008, with an average share of 33.65% from 2008 to 2013. The top contributor for the same period is the services sector, with an average share of more than 50%. In the sub-sector level, the agriculture (crops, livestock and poultry), hunting and forestry segment, with an average employment share of 30%, has the bigger share than the fishery segment with only a 4% average contribution to total employment for 2008 to 2013. Employment Contribution of Agriculture (in percent)

Year 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2008-2013
TOTAL AGRICULTURE 35.1 35.3 34.3 33.0 32.2 31.1 33.5
Agriculture, Hunting and Forestry 30.8 31.1 30.2 29.0 28.4 27.4 29.5
Fishery 4.3 4.2 4.2 3.9 3.8 3.7 4.0
Industry 15.3 14.8 14.5 14.9 15.3 15.6 15.1
Services 49.6 49.9 51.1 52.1 52.6 53.4 51.5

Source: Yearbook of Labor Statistics (2014)